September 21, 2014

September 21, 2014

Color Me Sad

Photograph by Nicolas Le Boulanger, National Geographic Your Shot

When Your Shot member Nicolas Le Boulanger sees his friend’s pet chameleon, housed in a terrarium, he can’t help thinking that it's in the wrong place, even if it’s loved. “I wanted to [relate] the confusion that this animal seems to feel as it is separated from its natural environment,” he writes. “His look seems to call for help.”

Le Boulanger’s picture recently appeared in the Your Shot assignment Not Your Average Pet.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.

7 comments
ccerlii c.
ccerlii c.

I believe it's right that Nicolas questions the contentment of his pet chameleon.   To his credit he's considering his actions and the well being of his loved pet.


Imagine if you were taken from your birth of origin, country, culture, language, way of life, comfortable home and surroundings and displaced into unnatural confinement.  Regardless if you were well taken care of, loved, admired the loneliness and isolation that you would feel separated from your family, friends, activities would create distress.  How could it be different for this chameleon or any other wildlife taken from it's natural habitat?



Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

Tho' its a great photograph,I think I'll skip the comments.  j.e.s.........

Yolanda Patterson
Yolanda Patterson

What a wonderful little creature that he can change his color to suit his fancy! 

James Loeffert
James Loeffert

Certainly some emotions are reflected in animals in as fight or flight. Expressions of happy or sad might fall into the perception that we interpret the emotions of animals, not as they are, but as we are.Case in point, we treat out pets as family members.

Linda S.
Linda S.

The poor thing does look sad...

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