May 2, 2014

Wolffish Den

Photograph by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes, National Geographic

In this picture originally published in the May 2014 issue of National Geographic magazine, a pair of Atlantic wolffish—named for their fangs—cozy up in a den in Bonne Bay, off the west coast of Newfoundland. The female departs after laying eggs, leaving their care to the male.

See more pictures from the May 2014 feature story "The Generous Gulf."

Hear David Doubilet speak about his passion for underwater photography »

23 comments
ideogram tianya
ideogram tianya

看起来很凶。狼鱼窝,雌鱼产卵后,留下雄鱼照看。

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

A beautiful photo of these two fish as is the beauty of all  life in our seas.

Tex Vel
Tex Vel

This picture do the wolf fish justice, beautiful!!. They don't eat other fish. Their diet consist of clams, crabs, sea urchin etc...all hard shelled "sea food". In return they are excellent table fare.that's why their number is rapidly dwindling.Fishing for this animal should be banned for at least 5 to 10 years so that their number can recover.   

Georgios Vlachos
Georgios Vlachos

this photo proves that real beauty is and will always be  away from forms

Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

How big are these fish anyway? And they have fangs? Hard to believe, and harder still as to how this amazing picture was taken. A real close up, of what seems to be monsters of the sea. Maybe they are small,and just were zoomed in on!  A good shot anyway  j.e.s........

Janice H.
Janice H.

Great close-up of these particular fish.    We can even see barnacles.      Awesome photograph!

Ros Riggs
Ros Riggs

Glad to see such a beautiful picture..  I remember having a territorial fight with a groper fish. ( which is not unlike these fish you have here) and he/she won.  the teeth are biggish,  but this picture is truly lovely.. with lovely colours.  this picture sure brought back memories for me.. thanks

Jessica Beals
Jessica Beals

I love the colors and textures in this photo!


It's incredible to me that in the cold waters that the wolffish inhabit such color and life can exist.

Para Noid
Para Noid

Extreme detail and wonderful lighting.

Yolanda Patterson
Yolanda Patterson

There is so much we still do not know about oceans and what is frightening is that we are slowly killing our own water! 

Lawrence Sibley
Lawrence Sibley

"I'm off to the beauty parlour, dear.  You can mind the kids while I'm gone."  Gone.  Yes, gone for good, she thinks to herself.


Quite the charming couple.  Wonder which one is the female?  My guess is the one in front, on the left.  And what delightfully colourful decor in their den!


Curious circle of small white orifices around their eyes.  The largest one seems to be a nostril, but fish breath with gills.  Wonder what their function is?


Wonderful colour and detail in this photo.

George Fell
George Fell

@Joy Saldanha To give you an idea of size, the head of an adult wolffish is about the size of a cantaloupe. I took a class in fish systematics, and we had a lab specimen that was only the head... fairly gruesome- they look much nicer alive and well in this photograph!

George Fell
George Fell

@Lawrence Sibley The small white holes around the eye are likely lateral line pores. Each  contains a tiny hair-like structure (called a neuromast) that allow the fish to detect tiny water movements and pressure changes.

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