January 10, 2013

Diving Bird, Mexico

Photograph by Karl Duncan, My Shot

This Month in Photo of the Day: Animal Pictures

While taking photos of Santa Maria reef near Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, I noticed this deep-diving bird chasing a massive school of baitfish in the middle of the reef. It was fast, but I was able to get this shot from above.

(This photo and caption were submitted to My Shot.)


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22 comments
mon mon
mon mon

Nature is awe inspiring. A diving bird isn't something one gets to see often :) Lucky! The photographs is also a nice composition. Thanks for sharing.

Karl Duncan
Karl Duncan

Thanks for the comments! The bird is a Double-crested Cormorant.

Andrew Gilman
Andrew Gilman

I personally like the new Nat Geo profiles.  I don't really know why you would need to hide both your first and last name and your location, unless I suppose you were commenting particularly horribly.  I love that there are maps showing where the person is from in the world - you're right, it really does add a global feel to the site and definitely enhances your mission.  Keep up the good work Nat Geo.  Too often people get nasty behind an anonymous keyboard now, and that really goes a long way to hurting the potential community that could be developed on a site like this.  Good job!

water bird
water bird

what a powerful and "moving" photo ..in all senses!   really unique and managed to make me feel like i was being engulfed ... compliments to Karl Duncan the photographer!  he also has an amazingly powerful rodeo image on his my shot gallery. 

thank-you for posting your art and special captures!

Once again
Once again

At last  i signed in to nat geo.i hated the new way i always loved the old way of signing in and out so easily with out all the data about me and my location i loved that this did not matter here. :(

water bird
water bird

Nat geo... what a disappointment... your editing options provided of public profile...  for whatever reasons a person may need or wish to remain anoymous online.  i do not wish to be forced to provide a name which can be easily  traced to me or also be FORCED to provide the city i live in ( the countery or region is more than enough)   or FORCED to click on a city that i do not live in if i prefer or wish or need  my privacy to be safeguarded, since i am not allowed to edit my location.    PLEASE review the  parameters you have set for display of our public profiles.    I am  really very shocked at this  type of update that you have introduced which to me is a MAJOR violation.

Rene Sada
Rene Sada

I am sure it is a cormorant, a close relative of the Anhinga, not sure which species.

Andrew Gilman
Andrew Gilman

Ooo new commenting system!  Good job Nat Geo!

Sasha Wagner
Sasha Wagner

I'm pretty sure this is an anhinga - They are amazing swimmers and fun to watch on land too :) Definitely one of my favorite birds!

So, What kind a bird is it?

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