January 10, 2013

Diving Bird, Mexico

Photograph by Karl Duncan, My Shot

This Month in Photo of the Day: Animal Pictures

While taking photos of Santa Maria reef near Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, I noticed this deep-diving bird chasing a massive school of baitfish in the middle of the reef. It was fast, but I was able to get this shot from above.

(This photo and caption were submitted to My Shot.)


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23 comments
mon mon
mon mon

Nature is awe inspiring. A diving bird isn't something one gets to see often :) Lucky! The photographs is also a nice composition. Thanks for sharing.

Karl Duncan
Karl Duncan

Thanks for the comments! The bird is a Double-crested Cormorant.

Andrew Gilman
Andrew Gilman

I personally like the new Nat Geo profiles.  I don't really know why you would need to hide both your first and last name and your location, unless I suppose you were commenting particularly horribly.  I love that there are maps showing where the person is from in the world - you're right, it really does add a global feel to the site and definitely enhances your mission.  Keep up the good work Nat Geo.  Too often people get nasty behind an anonymous keyboard now, and that really goes a long way to hurting the potential community that could be developed on a site like this.  Good job!

water bird
water bird

what a powerful and "moving" photo ..in all senses!   really unique and managed to make me feel like i was being engulfed ... compliments to Karl Duncan the photographer!  he also has an amazingly powerful rodeo image on his my shot gallery. 

thank-you for posting your art and special captures!

Once again
Once again

At last  i signed in to nat geo.i hated the new way i always loved the old way of signing in and out so easily with out all the data about me and my location i loved that this did not matter here. :(

water bird
water bird

Nat geo... what a disappointment... your editing options provided of public profile...  for whatever reasons a person may need or wish to remain anoymous online.  i do not wish to be forced to provide a name which can be easily  traced to me or also be FORCED to provide the city i live in ( the countery or region is more than enough)   or FORCED to click on a city that i do not live in if i prefer or wish or need  my privacy to be safeguarded, since i am not allowed to edit my location.    PLEASE review the  parameters you have set for display of our public profiles.    I am  really very shocked at this  type of update that you have introduced which to me is a MAJOR violation.

Rene Sada
Rene Sada

I am sure it is a cormorant, a close relative of the Anhinga, not sure which species.

Andrew Gilman
Andrew Gilman

Ooo new commenting system!  Good job Nat Geo!

Sasha Wagner
Sasha Wagner

I'm pretty sure this is an anhinga - They are amazing swimmers and fun to watch on land too :) Definitely one of my favorite birds!

So, What kind a bird is it?

Robert Michael Murray
Robert Michael Murray moderator expert

@Andrew G. thank you! It may be a small thing, but the team had a lot of fun building out the dynamic map. I know I'm excited to see the different locations that will appear on various member profiles.

water bird
water bird

@Once again 

in addition to my comment below , i also sent an email directly to    askngs@nationalgeographic.com

this is the natgeo general email address and then they forward the emails they receive to the approbriate person and/or dept.       i had seen your same comment a few days back, but since i hadn't posted a comment yet with the new guidelines , i was unaware of what you really were referring too!!   now that i know, i am still so upset that i am unable to appreciate the way it should be appreciated  the magnifcient photo of the day featured today.    

Meghan Murphy
Meghan Murphy expert

@Sasha Wagner I was wondering what kind of bird it was – amazing that they can do this. Where have you seen them?

Robert Michael Murray
Robert Michael Murray moderator expert

@water bird @Once again welcome back! And thank you for your comment, we appreciate your feedback and concerns. Allow me to introduce myself, my name is Robert Michael Murray and I lead engagement efforts here at the Society. I saw your comments and wanted to send you a personal message.

In asking our members to provide a name and location, we are hoping to create a stronger community where members can truly connect with individuals around the world who share similar passions. As we bring you closer to our explorers, photographers, writers, and the whole society, we believe our new member profiles will help build closer connections amongst our community. There is much more to come.

I understand that this answer might not address your concerns, but I hope you will continue to support National Geographic and allow us the opportunity to earn your trust over the coming weeks and months. If you have additional questions and concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me or my team at hello@nationalgeographic.com.

#LetsExplore!

Sasha Wagner
Sasha Wagner

 Someone else commented after me that this may also be a cormorant (very similar to the anhinga) - It's difficult to tell in this photo!  I currently live in south Florida and I see both species fairly regularly.  They are my favorite animals to watch when we go to the Everglades (even more so than the gators!) :)

Meghan Murphy
Meghan Murphy moderator expert

@water bird @Robert Michael Murray @Once again - Thanks for your question. I'm happy to help you change how your name appears on your public profile.

When you're logged in, hover your mouse over your name in the upper right part of the screen and you should see a drop-down list where you can click Settings. You'll see three options: Account, Profile and Interests. Under Account, you can change your name. Then under Profile, you can choose how your name displays. For example, I can choose between Meghan Murphy, M. Murphy and Meghan M.

As far as location, we mean that field to be more a representative location than the actual place where you are at this moment. This could be where you call home, where you most like to be, where you like to explore -- the place you identify with the most. As Robert said earlier, our goal is to represent our global community in the best way possible, so we want to hear about the places that mean the most to you.

Thanks again for the feedback and please don't hesitate to reach out to us at any time.

water bird
water bird

@Robert Michael Murray @water bird @Once again 

thank-you for your response and i wish you and nat geo all the success in these new goals and endeavors.  There is so MUCH where nat geo has been a trailbrazer or and provided the support to make dreams and the apparently impossibile possibile til now...so i firmly beleive that NAT GEO is and will con't to do so!

 So please give me the option  of setting my paramenters in my public profile ... of putting my name out there in full  , or abriaviated or my virtual choice.   same choice with my location... allow me to choose if i wish to put my city or just region or even just country.       i have also sent you a copy of the email that i had forwarded to askings@na.....   to your email that you kindly included in your message.   may i also just include one more input,  that based on my experiance , there is also a huge segment of the world that is very technologically advanced and   connects via computer on almost daily basis , but abhors anything that facebook is or represents.   not suggesting to ignore the facebook community and their significance, but please keep the rest of us in mind also.

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