September 22, 2013

Birdsville Race Track, Australia

Photograph by Rowan Bestmann, Your Shot

This Month in Photo of the Day: The Stories Behind Your Shots

Once a year, thousands of people descend on the remote town of Birdsville, Australia, for a three-day horse racing event in western Queensland's Diamantina Shire. Commissioned to document the Shire—a 36,000-square-mile area on the edge of the Simpson Desert—Your Shot contributor Rowan Bestmann was covering the event from a light plane when he came across this view of parked 4x4s. "The owners of these vehicles had driven from all over Australia," he says. "During the races, the town's two service stations sell more than 160,000 liters [42,000 gallons] of diesel fuel."

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30 comments
Steven Prosper
Steven Prosper

...and now just imagine if they all honked at once!

Gabrielle Ethington
Gabrielle Ethington

While some posters think this is not special, I decided to really look at it and imagine... I think of multicolor blocks striped on a background of gold silk. :)

Mako Tamura
Mako Tamura

Interesting. Feel like the view of one portion of the land; Austraria from the passenger window of the plane.

Amy Staudte
Amy Staudte

Yeah I agree with some of the confused posters here.  This photo doesn't remark any kind special skill in photography or film development.  For a NAtGeo pic of the day, it just falls way short of the rest of what they usually post.  I pass by parking lots filled with cars every day and it's not that impressive.

Sandip Dey
Sandip Dey

Great perspective and patterns. There is a story behind this shot as well ! Great execution !

Errol Vanzie
Errol Vanzie

Kool, it is interesting how the vehicles are neatly lined up even though there are no parking lines on the ground.

Karl Offen
Karl Offen

I'm not an expert on Australian autos but more than half look to be from the same model, awhile about half seem to be the same model even.

Ginger Parish
Ginger Parish

I like the perspective and colors. Congratulations!

Syed Y.
Syed Y.

whats so special about this photo?


Psx Tavi
Psx Tavi

except for three sedans all cars are SUVs or trucks

Steven G.
Steven G.

Not a particularly impressive shot.

Song Li
Song Li

Hi, just joined nationalgeographic. Is that possible to get a higher resolution of photos? 990x742 is too small. Thanks.

Justin Sykes
Justin Sykes

Looks like a giant child's toy set.

The parking alignment also appears to be child like. 

Janette Murdoch
Janette Murdoch

@Syed Yawar The location!!! It's isolation, the formation of 4x4s, invites you to think where is everyone, what are they all doing there....  Photography should spike our imagination to want to know more and this photo does, it is about Australia, it is about human nature, way of life, sad you can't see it

Jason Shepard
Jason Shepard

@Bergers Jeroen I very much agree with you. While the photo itself may be of good composition and framing, it also speaks volumes about the disgusting reliance on fossil fuels and the sheer enormity of the contribution of such events to global environmental destruction. I'm beginning to wonder if we will ever learn...

Simone Merrett
Simone Merrett

@Cedar Waxwing @Syed Yawar

Birdsville is a country town in central Australia on the edge of the Simpson Desert.  It is 383kms to nearest town, Boulia which only has a population of approx.250.  The normal population of Birdsville is approx. 115.  Once a year this swells up to 6000 - 8000 for a three day horse racing carnival.  People drive in from all over Australia.  Due to the desert conditions, isolation and condition of the road, most people will drive 4x4s.  It is considered a unique event.  Hope that helps.

Ginger Parish
Ginger Parish

@Cedar Waxwing @Bergers Jeroen Hi, When we upload our photos on Your Shot, we never know what the NG editors might choose to honor. They are looking for many things in a shot, color, perspective, creativity, use of the camera, etc. This shot was chosen. Why not congratulate the person whose photo was noticed? Or say nothing.

Your negative comments make me sad. Why even bother to speak out if it's a shot you don't like? You can just pass it by without trashing a person's work. 

Cedar Wawing, it looks like you are a member, but have not uploaded any photos. Perhaps if you upload photos some day, you'll realize what it feels like to put yourself out there. 

So far, I have experienced the Your Shot community to be nothing but supportive and open to new ideas. Today is the first time I have seen this kind of snarky  negative commentary. I hope I do not have to see this again.

If you don't like a photo, pass it by, then it will not be a "waste of your time." 

Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing

@Simone Merrett @Cedar Waxwing @Syed Yawar Not even close. The question is why is this photo of day? What makes this photo worthy of such an honer? Many of us just don't get it. It kind of looks like one of those photos when your camera goes off by accident.

Jason Shepard
Jason Shepard

@Ginger Parish Let me ask you a question, Ginger: Should we have "passed by" slavery and ignored it because we didn't like it?

 Think carefully before you respond to people. You may not like that they have said something negative, but every person is an individual and entitled his/her own opinion and to express that opinion. Your attempt to silence people because they disagreed with the validity of a photo is considerably more offensive than the comments posted here were.

 I hope I do not have to see another posting like yours here on NatGeo...

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