October 25, 2013

City Hall, Chicago

Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

This Month in Photo of the Day: The Power of Photography

A garland of nature crowns Chicago's City Hall, softening the hard edges of a town famous for steel and stone—and lowering summer temperatures on the roof.

See more pictures from the May 2009 feature story “Up on the Roof.”

Cook is one of 11 photographers featured in our "Women of Vision" exhibit. See more pictures from the exhibit and hear from the curators on Proof.

Watch Cook and Jenshel explore colorful gardens at night »

70 comments
Ebru Erte
Ebru Erte

Nice!! But always prefer natural green area rather than high buildings...

Rebecca Bernard
Rebecca Bernard

belle! si belle! Si seulement je pouvais lire des mots américains, pour que je puisse comprendre le titre! Américains stupides!

colter H.
colter H.

hiho!!  hiho!!!   its off to work we go!!!!!!!!!

Margo Isis Li
Margo Isis Li

I drew something like this when I was in art class. Who knew it actually existed.

calvin young
calvin young

Who would have thought such a beautiful space existed in the heart of a steel and glass enclave?  Nice building too.

Shannon T
Shannon T

I love this shot. Chicago is such a wonderful city. There's so much to see in this photo between the lovely rooftop garden and the buildings behind. Fantastic.

pawan kumar
pawan kumar

classical building among modern glass building , good composition . Beauty of blue hour

Randall Mueller
Randall Mueller

The half of the rooftop with the garden belongs to City Hall.  The half without the garden belongs to Cook County.  It's 2 different entities within the same building, with offices divided down the middle.

Israel Villares Corea
Israel Villares Corea

son los unicos y mejores del mundo los felicito deseo seguir viendolos jardin techado

David Cook
David Cook

A beautiful, Urban Garden of Eden!

Irene Lommers
Irene Lommers

That's just what I thought. Why do they use half the roof top?

Mark Reed
Mark Reed

Do they draw straws for the roof top offices?

John Chimon
John Chimon

why only half roof  why not the whole roof? 

Chudamani Akavaram
Chudamani Akavaram

More than on the roofs trees grown around the buildings and the public places like parks, should make a difference to the environment. Roof gardens are not more than an eye - wash really speaking.

William Cornette
William Cornette

@Chudamani Akavaram Rooftop gardens have a minor impact -- but they do have an impact.  With existing buildings, tearing it down and rebuilding is not an option, so trees around the building and rooftop gardens are better than nothing.  There is a building in New York that was built in an environmentally sound manner -- rainwater on the roof was collected in tanks in the basement and used as grey water (toilets, water plants, etc.), the windows were built with auto shades that blocked direct sun in the summer and let it in in the winter to reduces cooling and heating costs, bamboo rather than hardwoods, and like, just to name a few things incorporated into the building design.  This can be done when the building is designed and constructed, but changes to an existing older building are more difficult, so the little things add up  and help.

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