November 24, 2013

Computer Parts, French Polynesia

Photograph by Philippe Reichert, Your Shot

This Month in Photo of the Day: Your Shots

What is changing faster than our computers? This shot was taken in a high school yard in Tahiti, French Polynesia.

What Makes This a Photo of the Day? I love detail shots that play with the viewer's sense of scale. The tangled mass of hardware gives the feeling of gazing down into a dystopian mini-metropolis. —Alexa Keefe, Photo of the Day editor

This photo and caption were submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.


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38 comments
Esther Kalder
Esther Kalder

It looks like art to me. I don't know if it was photographed as it was, randomly piled up in that school yard for some unknowh reason, or if it was interfered by Mr. Reichert to create a specific composition and convey a message. In any case, it has both: a beautiful composition and a message. I like it.

Ajit F
Ajit F

This picture tells that how fast the computer parts and technology changes. What was advance yesterday is now out dated today. Nice colorful garbage. Thanks for the pics.

Ajit F
Ajit F

This picture tell that how fast the technology changes. What was advance yesterday is now out dated today. Nice colorful garbage. Thanks for the pics.

El'hUgo Espinoza
El'hUgo Espinoza

This just reminded me about Guiyu in China, the largest E-waste site on earth.

John Spencer
John Spencer

I'm not one to give rash or quick judgement to a photo by any means...But Really?!? I mean...I can run outside when I get off my computer, smash up some parts, lay my circuit boards in a pile, and take a shot of it with my iPhone and get a fairly close (not identical) image. I am by no means saying this photograph does not make a statement, nor am I saying it is a 'bad' photo. Just that I do not think it is 'Photo Of The Day' worthy on National Geographic. But Philippe, my hat's off to you on this one. I'm jealous. :)

Sean McConnell
Sean McConnell

nothing special at all.  the picture should tell the story, this picture doesn't tell me anything.

Shannon T
Shannon T

Very colorful garbage. Or is it meant to be art? Sometimes it's hard to tell with modern art. Good photo.

Sajjan Aryal
Sajjan Aryal

This is the reality of the 'Virtual World'

Michael M
Michael M

To all you NERDS and GEEKS complaining about how they are not technically computer parts... that is not the point of this photo. This is an awesome capture. The arrangement is cluttered, tangled, and spontaneous- to me, this shot speaks volumes. One might infer, from this photo, that many of the technologies we use everyday (i.e., computers, television sets, mobile phones), particularly in developed nations, aren't built to last!

Also, I like how the circuit boards are juxtaposed with a water bottle, all atop dying grass.

Romalliv Ykztilot
Romalliv Ykztilot

Nice capture. These boards are from monitors and from the computers' power supply units.

Roiikka-Ta P Globetrotter
Roiikka-Ta P Globetrotter

i like how this is just a small picture out of a bigger one. when they try to get rid of these things, some countries dont really have a way to except for in the trash. this just gives me one more reason to enjoy how our world is turning out right now with all this going on about climate change. it seems to be helping out "more than one person" ..

Lawrence Sibley
Lawrence Sibley

Electronic circuit board garbage.  The end result of the frenetic pace of innovations in electronics technology that creates a market demand for the latest new gadget that is likely more profitable than munitions in wartime.

Some geologists are theorizing that the earth has entered a new geological era - the anthropocene.  The enterprise of human civilization is now creating a geological strata on the planet - of concrete, asphalt and yes, electronic circuit board garbage.  And here's photographic evidence of it accumulating in French Polynesia!

Allen Kemmett
Allen Kemmett

for me its the few stems of grass in the corner of the picture that encapsulates.. c'mon someone argue with me, is it grass?

Christian Venturini
Christian Venturini

¿De donde provienen estos residuos tecnologicos? seria preocupante si fueran "importados".

Klox Gandicela
Klox Gandicela

They are boards on a CRT monitor, not necessary TV, before the advent of flat-screen LED/LCD monitors. Technically they are not computer parts but who cares. The picture does not play with my sense of scale, and the tangled mass does not give me the feeling of gazing down into a dystopian mini-metropolis.

Wendy Wilton
Wendy Wilton

I must be missing something as I don't get it was a good shot!

All in the eye of the beholder

Robert Marceau
Robert Marceau

A colourful photo, for sure.  However, some explanation of how these TV parts ended up in a school yard would be appropriate.  An photo that tries to make an activist statement without appropriate context comes off as a bit disingenuous.

BTW, I believe that Jon b. is correct.  I see no computer components in this photo.

Joeven Infante
Joeven Infante

I am not into photography but I am a big fan of amazing images captured on camera. This one is quite nice!

Mat Millies
Mat Millies

Trash of s*** from occidental developed country send to polute others place.....

Steven G.
Steven G.

So playful! So colorful! I love the part of the description that mentions the mini-metropolis. I remember being a child and looking at circuit boards and playing such a game in my mind. You can get lost in there forever!!

Jon b.
Jon b.

They look more like old TV circuit boards to me - still, I like the photo

Roiikka-Ta P Globetrotter
Roiikka-Ta P Globetrotter

@Wendy Wilton alot of people think of the location of where it is and how amazing it is of how they are disposed of there than how sparse they are in other places (when people dont need them any more) and the mysterious connection between countries and civilizations and people.

Philippe Reichert
Philippe Reichert

@Robert Marceau I'm not into computers. To me, a monitor is part of the computer. I guess there are computers in every school nowadays. When they get too old, they dismantle them and try to recycle. If it's an activist statement to show this, so be it. You may have seen documentaries about the mountains of electronic just western (and other) countries send to remote villages in China, where people ruin their health trying to collect a few grams of precious metal. THIS is a statement.

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