February 1, 2014

Reflecting the Ages

Photograph by Paul Weeks, National Geographic Your Shot

"While in Beijing last year, my travel buddy and I stumbled out of our hotel around 5 a.m. and began walking in search of a location to shoot the sunrise," writes Your Shot contributor Paul Weeks. "After a few miles we discovered this great reflective angle along one of the long corners of the Forbidden City's outer walls. I'm not sure why it's called that, seeing as you can get inside for just a few yuan, but I do know that this structure is very old. Built in the 1400s, it has seen many people come and go at this very location."

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70 comments
Yinyin Sg
Yinyin Sg

Paul Week's comments are very rude & shows pure stupidity & ignorance.Photography is about appreciating the beauty & respecting the subject. It's called Forbidden City as it was used as a home for the previous rulers of China, the emperor for about 400 years. It was also used as a parliamentary meeting place, the highest political assembly area. I am unsure where you come from  but will you say that of the white house(US)? The ticket is cheap to encourage visitors & it does not mean an expensive ticket =  the place is superior. The tickets to visit Buckingham Palace or Vatican are not very expensive compared to some other places. So ,does it mean they are inferior?

Liang Chen
Liang Chen

the picture is perfect, but when I was in the situation like the picture. I think everything is normal. Why?

Roelf Oving
Roelf Oving

Beautiful! I love the composition and the reflection on the water.

EVAN Nielsen
EVAN Nielsen

wonderful shot perfect in every way OUTSTANDING  

Ellen Glenn
Ellen Glenn

The snap of your camera lens allows us all to be there with you in Beijing at that early morning moment.  Thank you for sharing this amazing photo.  The composition is perfect for the subject!

S. Du
S. Du

wunderschöööön

Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

I wish that I could actually see things like this. But then any image viewed soon goes into ones 'memory bank' and is blurred or at worst forgotten. This picture is crisp, clear and there to view whenever one wants. Hurrah, for the great photographers who time and again bring great shots like this one to us.  May I say, thank you.  j.e.s. 

Lola Rosique
Lola Rosique

Perfect symmetry, perfect shot. I love it!

Lau Michael
Lau Michael

小時候我家裏有一幅與這個基本一樣(角度)及大小的刺繡, 當時我一直以爲是一張照片.  

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

Great reflections. Thanks Shawn Wang for your information. Great to know.

Shawn Wang
Shawn Wang

The so-called Forbidden City was actually the royal palace in ancient China, where the common people were forbidden to enter, thus the name 'forbidden city'. 

mn tb
mn tb

The photo is wonderful! But: " I'm not sure why it's called that, seeing as you can get inside for just a few yuan"?  It was supposed to be a funny remark? Or just anogher case of USA tourists showing off being ignorant of the cultures they are visiting?

Yinyin Sg
Yinyin Sg

just read the comments below, the Forbidden Palace was supposed to be a holy place, sarcastic remarks shouldn't be used here

Paul Weeks
Paul Weeks

@mn tb Thanks for your comment, I'm sorry that my sarcasm was lost on you. Dig a little deeper and you would have found that I've written about my appreciation of Chinese culture on multiple occasions. Your comment was actually a bit ironic... 

Mike Bless
Mike Bless

@mn tb   It may have also been that he was looking forward to the comments of people who appreciate his self security and ability to publicly say "I don't know". I guess he must have spent his time learning other things for a moment, but now he knows the meaning of the forbidden city as well as other things that we may not know!

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

No need to be rude mn tb. Next time we have a querry. We will look you up for all the answeres.

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

To attack someones intellegents, Alexander, ( USA tourists) is not very nice. We are all or mostly photographers here who understands that and not all of us are able to travel outside of our own countries and let alone have all the cultural knowledge of those who live there. Mike Bless had a very nice way to defend someone who maybe didn't know all there was to know -  including me. Go well.

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