March 27, 2013

Ghadames, Libya

Photograph by George Steinmetz, National Geographic

This Month in Photo of the Day: National Geographic Magazine Features

Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view.

See more pictures from the February 2013 feature story "New Old Libya."

Get the story behind the shot in a Q&A with George Steinmetz »

26 comments
Adel HIBA
Adel HIBA

Hello Everybody here in the NG Comunity, i am new guest in the NG Magazine. I am origenally from Germany and i am originally from Libya and i was born and raised in the city of Ghadames. I would like to share my city life stayle and History with zou all and i am really happy to answer all your questiones as much as i can.

The city of Ghadames, it's very old  city is really nice a place to see and know about and i am proud of being Ghadamesi. the city now is empty no people live there and its owned by the people and they still keep thier houses for generation and still using them in weekends specially Friday where people go for pryer in the old mosqes there. In summer time people use it as skip place a way from the hot summer days. old people in the old days they used to use oil candles to walk a round the city specially at night. however, there is also electricity now in the city which was first interdused during the French collony for that region in middfifthes 50th.(happy to tell more) 

K. Vitug
K. Vitug

I wonder how crowded can this whole town in Libya be? BTW, I love its bird's eye view (as student architect )

Micaela Mustache
Micaela Mustache

I love how the houses are crowed and the trees are puffy and green.

CoShane Rich
CoShane Rich

I like how all of the houses are togather

delbert knightman
delbert knightman

I really like how you took the picture it is a good one. you can see all the houses are together.

Cason Purell
Cason Purell

I wonder how the photographer got the shot. I wonder if they have electricity.

Quintino Raiderfan
Quintino Raiderfan

I like how all the buildings are connected. In Libya is there power or do they use candles.

Kobe Johnson
Kobe Johnson

I like how this place is packed and is like a puzzle

Tabitha Sage
Tabitha Sage

Are there any more houses beyond those houses?  If you look at the houses you can see that there are barley any houses that have a square roof.

matthew s.
matthew s.

I like the view from all the way up here. It looks like some thing dr.sues. would put in a movie.

Isaiah The Hottie
Isaiah The Hottie

I like the way that the houses are buntched together. It almost looks like a puzzle.

journee journee
journee journee

I like how you got all the houses and how you could see all there irregular shapes.

seth basketball
seth basketball

do the people have electricity in there houses. Do they use candles.

Ayisha Christmas
Ayisha Christmas

I wonder how it would feel to live here. I think it would be kind of fun to walk on top of houses like that. But how would you  find your way home?

Justin Herobrine
Justin Herobrine

Do people in Lybia have elctricity? I also wonder how the people live in this small town.

Mallory K
Mallory K

I love how there is trees in between the little houses. I like house they made paths to one house to another.

Ramsay Nike
Ramsay Nike

I like how the photographer got a picture from the sky. You can see how all the houses are crouded and how hard it would be to find your house.

corbin beast
corbin beast

I like how he got the picture in the air so that you can see the holes in the roof.  And you can see how crowded and you can see that there hooked together.

Aidan Nunook
Aidan Nunook

I really like how he took the shot from above. and I also wonder how they find their houses.

Shai Shai
Shai Shai

I like how there are houses crowed together. Each house looks like a puzzle piece. Do they have electricity in Libya?

Bodell Cougars
Bodell Cougars

I love how the picture is taken from the sky. You can really see how crowded all the houses are.

Stephen Dahl
Stephen Dahl

Puts one in mind of the biblical story of David and Bathsheba. Obviously he had a too high a viewpoint!

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