July 5, 2014

50 Shades of Ray

Photograph by Eduardo Lopez Negrete

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.

This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Winners will be announced July 31.


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55 comments
Mark Freerks
Mark Freerks

Looks like an abstract image made of living creatures

zou xiu
zou xiu

grant sight ,magnificent sight

Drkamal Mohanani
Drkamal Mohanani

THEY GIVE                      LIGHTING - DR K M

DRISHYA G
DRISHYA G

wow.......................................

Janice H.
Janice H.

Love this photo, love rays.          Such a sight to see, marvelous seeing this many together all at once.      They are so fascinating!         Truly a great shot.

rick corman
rick corman

to hip wish  i was there!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Shannon T
Shannon T

Fabulous. What an amazing experience that must have been. Rays are so beautiful.

Yolanda Patterson
Yolanda Patterson

Never in all my life have I ever seen so many together at once! 

andy smart
andy smart

I am wondering which animal feeds on them in the ocean?

Wayne  Norman
Wayne Norman

I love the way the shadow moves from deep to shallow and it all reminds me of words or letters clustered deliberately or a flock of frenzied gulls.  Wonderful capture, and yes the light and composition are really cool.  Thanks for sharing and congrats.

Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

Normally one sees pictures of a single ray, or maybe a couple, so seeing this magnificent school of them is wonderful, and it seems a 'hard catch'to get as well..Congrats"on this great shot.  j.e.s.........

Tariq Othman
Tariq Othman

And we're happy to see only one! Amazing picture!

Bev Hennager
Bev Hennager

Do they move together like blackbirds?  Amazing.

Bruce Williams
Bruce Williams

@andy smart Excellent question. Their prime predators are sharks, whose numbers have been all but wiped out. Now we have these huge schools of rays, who feed on mollusks. In the Chesapeake Bay, the abundance of rays due to the loss of sharks turned into total collapse of the shellfish population, and the industry that depended on them. Everyone oohs and aahs at what a beautiful site this is ... it's a sign of marine ecological collapse.

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