January 12, 2014

A Plain Difference

Photograph by Robin Moore, National Geographic Your Shot

A black rhino and two zebras stand on Kenya's Laikipia Plains.

This photo and caption were submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.

80 comments
Black Songbird
Black Songbird

Unicorns exist. They're just short, fat, and we call them rhinos. :D

Jokes aside, I think I'm in love.


Dave Hyde
Dave Hyde

I love the angle you selected... very nice photograph.

Nathan Rowland
Nathan Rowland

Beautiful and majestic, would love to frame it for all to enjoy!!

JERRY-DOMINIQUE ATTERE
JERRY-DOMINIQUE ATTERE

Wow! Beautiful composition! Love how Robin Moore was nice and low in taking this shot!!

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

Unless they are standing very much further back.... the Rino seems  very large in comparison with the Zebras. His head in the photo is as long as the length of the Zebras. Not normal under any circumstances as I am from South Africa where I come in contact with these animals constantly 

Sorry I am not questioning the composition of the photo - I think its a great photo even if it was "put together" as such. I do love that you have done it in Black & White.

Turning photos into B & W is also a good way of turning uninteresting photos into something special and different and giving them "life".

Thomas Walch
Thomas Walch

Marvelous picture, reminds me of my short time in Africa

Saidur Rahman
Saidur Rahman

Looks like there is a small bird on the Rhino, too :)

Martha Pope
Martha Pope

Gorgeous.  Simply beautiful.  I have been there and it is heaven on earth.  

Ess Mickey
Ess Mickey

Mr. Adams would be proud.  Perfect exposure.

J. Eicher
J. Eicher

Wow!  Amazing!  Love the definition and sky!

Yoysy Olivero
Yoysy Olivero

El Rinoceronte Observa La Vida. Desde Su Perspectiva. Amor. Convicción Y Vición.

Maria Salloum
Maria Salloum

Life really is a matter of perspective.  Very interesting.

Mairead K.
Mairead K.

The composition of this photo makes it truly beautiful! 

As a high school student with a passion for photography, I always turn to National Geographic for inspiration.

For those interested my work can be found here: http://maireadkahn.wordpress.com/

Isabel Correia
Isabel Correia

Hi Joey. I'm sorry. By mistake I click on wrong bottom. I like what you said. Sorry. Kindest regards

Black Songbird
Black Songbird

@melody kirby cool*. Spelling something wrong doesn't make it any cooler, and if it was unintentional, then knowing the correct spelling is important. Anyways, sorry if this bothers you. It is simply one of my biggest pet-peeves, and I always try to make sure my own spelling is correct.


Rebecca Clark
Rebecca Clark

@Sandra HickmanWhat do you mean "put together"?  Why so cynical about this photo?  It's apparent that the rhino is closer than the zebras.  The photo does not look "put together".  The sky is perfect.  No photoshopping was done here.

Black Songbird
Black Songbird

@Saidur Rahman If I'm not mistaken, the birds eat ticks and other small bugs that act as parasites to the rhino. Fun fact.

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

Sorry. My wording does sound a bit odd - not my intention. It is a great photo and Im not disputing that - the Rhino just looks a bit big compared to the Zebra even if they are slightly further away - I meant that a lot of photos are photoshoped and these days it is difficult to see whats real and whats not because things are so cleverly done. What I meant was that even if it was photoshopped (which is wasn't), it would still be a great photo.

Black Songbird
Black Songbird

@Sandra Hickman Its called perspective, just putting it out there. The reason the 'set up' is so hard to simply stumble across is probably one of the reasons this picture was taken. But you are right, it is a great photo.

Robin Moore
Robin Moore

@Sandra Hickman Sandra, I can definitely confirm that this is not photoshopped (other than, of course, the usual processing of exposure and conversion to black and white). The composition is as it came out of the camera, and the rhino simply looks larger because of the perspective   - I do not think National Geographic would knowingly feature a photograph like this that had been doctored to artificially make the rhino bigger.

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