November 10, 2013

Street Art, Tel Aviv

Photograph by Lydia Polimeni, Your Shot

This Month in Photo of the Day: Your Shots

I was captivated by this airbrushed artwork in an industrial section of Tel Aviv, Israel. It really appeared as if a window to another dimension had opened up. As you look at the picture you will also notice other artworks on the facade of the building.

What Makes This a Photo of the Day? I am delighted by this atypical "picture of a picture." I stared at it for a few minutes, wondering if the tiny dancers were actually real people photographed through a smudged window. Once that question was answered my eye took in the other details of the facade. This is a detail shot I want to spend time exploring. —Alexa Keefe, Photo of the Day editor

This photo and caption were submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.


See more pictures from Your Shot's Daily Dozen »
Get tips on photographing details »

38 comments
Mitchell Blickman
Mitchell Blickman

This is a pretty comprehensive compilation of street art around Tel Aviv - www.TelAvivStreetArt.com

Sean McConnell
Sean McConnell

the art is the exceptional thing, the photograph itself adds nothing to the subject matter apart from allowing us to see it

Ranu Jain
Ranu Jain

love the juxtaposition of the grunge and the delicate elegance of a dance in silhouette ! great photo !

Shannon T
Shannon T

It does appear to be a window to another dimension. Such a contrast between the elegance of ballet and the deterioration of the building. Love it.

Marlene Simmons
Marlene Simmons

Beautifully done.   The delicate details amoung the harder contrast of concrete and shadow... oh so inviting!

Lydia Polimeni
Lydia Polimeni

Thank you everyone for the thoughts and compliments!

Sajjan Aryal
Sajjan Aryal

Unexpectedly unique....That's what art is about. 

Lucas Siegmann
Lucas Siegmann

Wow, I thought, no way, this is definitely photoshop, but the light and shade are too perfectly combined. Nice one.

Janice H.
Janice H.

Alexa Keefe says it perfectly.         My thoughts exactly!        Fascinating details with a warm, peaceful feeling.

Denyse Holt
Denyse Holt

Alice through the looking glass.  I am swept away.

Paul Vandenberg
Paul Vandenberg

Great photo Lyndia, it does make you look at the detail, the art work is just real simple stencil works, but the framing and capture do make them appear more detailed. 

judy north
judy north

Isn't that a Banksy on the left?

Lydia Polimeni
Lydia Polimeni

The reason I took this shot is reflected in Alexa Keefe's explanation as well as in the comments below - the scene really required a double take. I want to shout out to the airbrush artist, whoever he/she may be, that created such an enchanting little piece. And thank you all for the kind comments! 

rob scholes
rob scholes

As I looked at your picture my first thought was photoshop...then mirror projection...then how the hell did she do that?  I never once thought transdimensional migration so I thank you for the morning mental exercise. Great shot.

pawan kumar
pawan kumar

though real dancers steals the view ,wall pictures r making true sense of the shot

Justin Sykes
Justin Sykes

I wish the graffiti "artists" in my neighbourhood were so artistic.  In this beautiful triptych the viewer is asked to do some work.  This is not a photo for the lazy.  Immediately the eye is drawn to the Degas like ballerinas, but then the gentleman on the left jumps into view.  Naturally there will be more to find, and the figures on the right panel spring alive.  This is all before we take in the nuanced textures of the wall.

This photo is a delight. It is truly a piece of art in its own right. Congratulations Ms Polimeni. 

Technicality / Composition / Content / X factor / originality = 9/10 zoom lenses 

Lydia Polimeni
Lydia Polimeni

@Sean McConnellThat's why I consider this a "documentary" photograph - it's essentially a picture of a picture. That being said, I did try to frame the artwork itself in such a way as to give it context and make a pleasing composition (rather than just zoom in on the piece itself.)

Special Offers

Shop National Geographic