December 24, 2013

Wintry Wait

Photograph by Johnny Haglund

This Month in Photo of the Day: National Geographic Photo Contest Images

In February 2012, a few people wait for the bus as the temperature drops below minus 30ºF (about minus 35ºC) in the northeast Russian city of Susuman. In this area the winter can bring temperatures down to minus 58ºF (minus 50ºC).

(This photo and caption were submitted to the 2012 National Geographic Photo Contest.)


See all 2012 contest entries »
Browse galleries of our editors' favorites from this year's contest »

22 comments
Rafael Koria
Rafael Koria

wonderful mood in this great Low Light photo

Gabriella Armstrong
Gabriella Armstrong

I went across Russia a few years ago, in Winter and it was magical. I was lucky to get -27C.

Janice H.
Janice H.

Brrr..... the cool shades of most buildings, along with the chilling mist enveloping the photograph, enable you to literally feel the depth of the cold!           

Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

Brrrrr!   Even with its extreme temp: the shot is not without its color,this I like very much. The house behind the bus and the two figures highlighted by it, is what I looked at quite a lot. The rest is a good picture that I cannot get technical about, really dont know how!   j.e.s  

Bev Hennager
Bev Hennager

It appears that the building directly beyond the people waiting at the stop, is damaged and in neglect.  The hill beyond looks like it has been scavenged.  This tells me  the story of extreme hardship and living on the edge.    

Ezzat Pavpar
Ezzat Pavpar

Cold and beautiful city with old buildings

orange Doctor
orange Doctor

superb.thnx NGEO.and i like mr.sibley's comment.thnk u too.

Lawrence Sibley
Lawrence Sibley

Gasoline and electricity bring heat and light and transportation to this arctic-like environment in Russia.  Plants and wild animals have evolved survival adaptations to endure the winter.  That big hill in the background is still not urbanized, but it does look like it has been logged over.  It's expanse is a reminder of the natural environment into which human civilization has intruded.


A pretty long exposure was required to make that mountain visible in the photo, but the compromise has been that the yellow bus is a blur.  Fortunately, the pedestrians were stationary, or their figures would be a blur also.


It's neat the way any photograph subtracts two dimensions from the four dimensions of space and time.  Removed are the dimension of spatial depth, and the flow of time.  But of course, we the observers of the photographic image, are still existing in four dimensions (and a few more than that, according to astrophysicists).

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