March 10, 2014

Fading Gray

Photograph by Erika Larsen, National Geographic

Horses forever changed life on the Great Plains, and for Native Americans today, they endure as an emblem of tradition and a source of pride, pageantry, and healing. Here, Zoda, whose name means “gray” in Hidatsa, serves in a youth wellness program in North Dakota.

See more pictures from the March 2014 feature story “People of the Horse.”


Erika Larsen's portraits of Native Americans and their horses »
Watch "People of the Horse: Special Bond" »

40 comments
PAUL ASHMAN
PAUL ASHMAN

If I released an album this is my cover 

pamela letstalkaboutcorsica
pamela letstalkaboutcorsica

Imagination or real, the choice is ours after all. A timeless shot, this is what attracts me personally. I can well understand a healing atmosphere deriving from within, and the urge to blend. 

Stunning.

Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

Arun, this is a different kind of photograph. Intentional in the way it looks,defused not blurred,or out of focus. Just plain different from sharp and crystal clear. Its great we are so diverse in our likes and dislikes, or it would indeed be a boring world. j.e.s.     

Quincy Von Wildbeast
Quincy Von Wildbeast

Love this. Speaks to my heart, of a time past that most have forgotten or forsaken.

Skiv Skiv
Skiv Skiv

Это лошадь из мультфильма "Ёжик в тумане")

Janice H.
Janice H.

Ghost horse!           Beautiful Zoda is doing a wonderful service in North Dakota.      Lovely horse and amazingly different photograph Erika Larsen!

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

No one knows where the wind comes from or where it goes. This photo using imagination could be a horse in a storm or fading away in the mist... either way it is as you would like to see it. I like to see it as a horse fading away into the mists of time. To others it would just be a very blurry picture.

Joy Saldanha
Joy Saldanha

Beautiful,beautiful,beautiful......  both the horse and the photography. I simply love it,and there is no more that I can say. j.e.s.

Arun Brahma
Arun Brahma

I dont get this...please explain how this is blurred out of focus picture is fine photography 

Bev Hennager
Bev Hennager

Beautiful!  And my favorite subject.  


gemma foley
gemma foley

Stunning! How was this taken? I wouldnt know where to begin with camera settings

Werner Kujnisch
Werner Kujnisch

Let's get real.  This is one blurred picture .. nothing to look at.

Lawrence Sibley
Lawrence Sibley

 Such an ethereal apparition!  A visual invocation of the essence and spirit of the horse. 

Theresa H.
Theresa H.

@Arun Brahma  Without the blur it is just a photo of a white horse and you might actually think it boring. The blur invites mystery, movement, maybe timelessness or whatever else your heart reaches for.  If you don't feel it, it's not art to you. Art is always subjective. Where you see just an out of focus photo, I see a magic horse.

Mike Bless
Mike Bless

@Arun Brahma  Unfortunately often time s a flowery story that goes with the photo which has uncommon words helps it to get attention. Look for this pattern yourself in future photos. You may sometimes see a 9-or 10 photo with a poor story and that photo never gets success, and then see a 7 photo with a story that attracts attention to the editors, and then also astounds many viewers who would have otherwise never said anything positive about the succesful photo.

Shane Hughes
Shane Hughes

@Arun Brahma  I am assuming this effect was intentional on the photographer's part. Using a long exposure to create a ghostly effect, since the story deals with the past cultures of Native Americans which like the horse in this image seems to be fading away. Just a guess though. 

Sandra Hickman
Sandra Hickman

To 90% of the population - a photo is either a good photo or a bad photo.This would be classed as a very very bad photo had you wanted a picture sharp photo. Who knows what was in this photographers mind when she submitted this photo... either taking a chance or having her own imagination as to what could happen here with views..... seems that most enjoy the photo with their own ideas of what it should be like. I have tried to change my mindset on how to view a photo and  imagination now plays a big role in that. Crazy though it seems it puts a whole new perspective on how you think. Have you ever wondered where the Lord got His imagination from when He created the earth. Who would have imagined how a tree should look like or how a bird should be painted in all its glory and beautiful colours. Makes you think.

steven handy
steven handy

I believe in greatness in a lot of peoples photos it is all about seeing it from there perspective on what side of photography they do and there techniques and you cant just be negative about certain peoples photos just because you don't understand there line of work  you people really need to start critiquing in the right way instead of just being negative about it give them the positive side of there work and also tell them what they can work on as well.

Ruth Aguiar
Ruth Aguiar

@Sandra Hickman  Why do people assume that not negative - but not positive either - comments don't know a dime about photography? I do. And I still think that the same idea could have been applied with better results.

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