October 18, 2011

Oceanic Whitetip Shark, Bahamas

Photograph by Brian Skerry, National Geographic

This Month in Photo of the Day: Photos From New National Geographic Books

An oceanic whitetip shark and diver swim in the Bahamas.

(From the National Geographic book Ocean Soul by Brian Skerry)


Pre-order the book Ocean Soul »
See more pictures of the Caribbean »
See more pictures of oceans »

18 comments
Jerri-Lea Stoley
Jerri-Lea Stoley

absolutely love this, this is my favorite shark, so beautiful

Mina Farhani
Mina Farhani

Guess what goes on in the mind of the shark?

should I eat him should I not?
if I eat him I must do sth with his camera.

Kennedy Santiago
Kennedy Santiago

Good morning friends and divers. surely this shark was not inteded to attack the diver. as explained colleague Dan Cook, we are not part of your diet. Most attacks are "caused" by bathers and surfers, rarely a diver. it takes dismistificar the image of this magnificent amimal and learn to respect them. after we killed miloes dels per year. Are we the great predator.

Nancy Ho
Nancy Ho

He is so going to wet his pants.

Dan Cook
Dan Cook

That's a great photo.. I wonder if the diver was surprised when the shark swam by?

Dan Cook
Dan Cook

People are not part of a shark's normal diet.  I guess if they are hungry enough or annoyed then they attack people but mostly they eat fish.  Also that dive gear, wetsuit, camera, etc.. probably wouldn't taste good.

Nikola Grzesinski
Nikola Grzesinski

How did the diver survived? Is it true that sharks are mistaking us for seals? What chances would have a single diver meeting a single white shark if is any bleeding injury in the diver`s body? Would he attack if would smell a blood from the human?

Romwayne Alfonz Saavedra
Romwayne Alfonz Saavedra

@Nikola Grzesinski  The shark you see here is actually in front of the man. White-tip shark only grows up to 1.6 m (5.2 ft). Still, this is a beautiful photo of how magnificent sharks are -like what lions are on land.

Special Offers

  • multiproduct_email_100x75_jancover.jpg

    National Geographic

    Subscribe to National Geographic magazine and save. Print and digital editions available for as little as $12.