Nicolas Reynard was a Paris-based photographer who traveled the world on assignments documenting such diverse subjects as the fall of the Berlin Wall, the gulf war, Caribbean sharks, and stingrays.

His work appeared in National Geographic magazine as well as numerous other international publications, including Life and the New York Times Magazine.

Reynard died in a plane crash in the Amazon on November 11, 2004, while on assignment for French publications. He was 45.

Fellow photographer and friend Scott Wallace described Reynard as "a gifted, hard-working photographer who plunged headlong into whatever project he happened to be working on. He did nothing halfway."

Reynard first worked with National Geographic in 1996 on a Web feature called "Korubo: Expedition Contact." The expedition culminated in the first ever peaceful contact with the previously uncontacted Korubo Indians of Brazil. He went on to work on several other assignments for the magazine.

Wallace, quoting Reynard's father, wrote that Reynard had dreamed of being a National Geographic photographer since childhood.

"He lived," wrote Wallace, "and ultimately died, doing what he loved to do: discovering the world and sharing his vision of it with the rest of humanity."

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